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First published in The Potter May 2005
Text © Copyright John Heaton 2005

Kibblestone Scout Camp

Geography

The map covers the grounds of Kibblestone International Scout Camp – as the name implies attracting visitors worldwide. It is dissected by two roads, one a minor road from the village of Oulton and the other the main A520 Stone to Meir road. Fortunately the latter is crossed via a tunnel. The central and largest section comprises about 65% open grassland with small wooded or fenced features dotted around. This area is the main camping grounds and is peppered around the fringes by small buildings, numerous flagpoles and fireplaces. The remainder is woodland, mainly the western slopes of the deep valley which the A520 follows. The western section is mainly open (with very little undergrowth) woodland in a big reentrant with 8 reentrants on the upper slopes and rising up to 40m. The eastern section accessed by the tunnel under the A520 comprises the eastern slopes of the stream valley. The lower steeper slopes are wooded, 40% of which is white. The upper slopes are made up of a plantation of young trees about 1.5m high. Within this area are some old hedgerows and a shallow reentrant. Unfortunately there is a blanket of nettle undergrowth which at the middle of April was only 3" high, but I am assured by Geoff Hollins who planned last year this was 3' high by the second week of May.

Event History

Mapped by Dave Peel late in 2003 and first used for an Evening Local Event in 2004; it will be used again this year [2005] on an evening in May.

History

Most of the the area was the grounds of a large house called Kibblestone Hall which stood somewhere below the wooded slopes of the far western section. There were two flint mills operating in the stream valley. Wetmore Flint Mill was on the west side of the stream and Mostylee Mill on the east side. Both buildings are still standing, the mill wheel for the former is still in position. The mill race for this can be seen when approaching the road tunnel.

John Heaton